programas cribado cancer

Nota bibliográfica cribado c colorrectal 2014-04

Ouakrim DA, Boussioutas A, Lockett T, Hopper JL, Jenkins MA. Cost-effectiveness of family history-based colorectal cancer screening in Australia. BMC Cancer. 2014;14(1):261. Available from: doi: 10.1186/1471-2407-14-261. PMID: 24735237.

CONCLUSION: The model demonstrates that intensive colorectal cancer screening strategies targeting people at increased risk would be cost-effective in the Australian context. Our findings provide evidence that substantial health benefits can be generated from risk-based CRC screening at a relatively modest incremental cost.

Brenner H, Stock C, Hoffmeister M. Effect of screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy on colorectal cancer incidence and mortality: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies. BMJ. 2014;348.

Conclusions Compelling and consistent evidence from randomised controlled trials and observational studies suggests that screening sigmoidoscopy and screening colonoscopy prevent most deaths from distal colorectal cancer. Observational studies suggest that colonoscopy compared with flexible sigmoidoscopy decreases mortality from cancer of the proximal colon. This added value should be examined in further research and weighed against the higher costs, discomfort, complication rates, capacities needed, and possible differences in compliance.

Pruitt SL, Leonard T, Zhang S, Schootman M, Halm EA, Gupta S. Physicians, Clinics, and Neighborhoods: Multiple Levels of Influence on Colorectal Cancer Screening. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014;
Available from: doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-1130.

Conclusions: Significant and substantial variability was observed across neighborhood, physician, and clinic levels in CRC test use, suggesting the importance of factors at each of these levels on CRC testing. Impact: Future multilevel research and intervention should consider the simultaneous influences of multiple levels, including clinic, physician, and neighborhood.

Brenner H, Kloor M, Pox CP. Colorectal cancer. Lancet. 2014;383(9927):1490–502. Available from: doi:

 More than 1·2 million patients are diagnosed with colorectal cancer every year, and more than 600 000 die from the disease. Incidence strongly varies globally and is closely linked to elements of a so-called western lifestyle. Incidence is higher in men than women and strongly increases with age; median age at diagnosis is about 70 years in developed countries. Despite strong hereditary components, most cases of colorectal cancer are sporadic and develop slowly over several years through the adenoma–carcinoma sequence. The cornerstones of therapy are surgery, neoadjuvant radiotherapy (for patients with rectal cancer), and adjuvant chemotherapy (for patients with stage III/IV and high-risk stage II colon cancer). 5-year relative survival ranges from greater than 90% in patients with stage I disease to slightly greater than 10% in patients with stage IV disease. Screening has been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence and mortality, but organised screening programmes are still to be implemented in most countries.

Logan RF a, Patnick J, Nickerson C, Coleman L, Rutter MD, von Wagner C. Outcomes of the Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) in England after the first 1 million tests. Gut. 2012;61(10):1439–46. Available from: doi: 10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300843. PMID: 22156981.
CONCLUSION: In this first round of screening in England uptake and fecal occult blood test positivity was in line with that from the pilot and the original European trials. Although there was the expected improvement in cancer stage at diagnosis, the proportion with left-sided cancers was higher than expected
web desarrollada y mantenida por :